Closeted gay soldiers more likely to attempt suicide

Study shows soldiers who do not reveal their sexuality are more likely to show signs of extreme stress, or Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Closeted gay soldiers more likely to attempt suicide
01 March 2013

Gay soldiers who do not reveal their sexuality while in service are more likely to attempt suicide, a study has found.

Researchers at the University of Montana and other institutions found compared to their straight counterparts, lesbian, gay and bisexual soldiers in the closet are more likely to be depressed, have anxiety disorders and take drugs.

From 1981 to 2011, the US anti-gay policy Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) said gay people should not serve openly in the military, but the effects are still affecting thousands of people.

Bryan Cochran, a contributing scientist, told GSN the problem with having LGB soldiers in the military was not the people themselves, but the harrassment they experienced.

Actual suicide attempts in LGB soldiers is 14.7%, compared to another study which said suicide attempts was 0.0003% for the entire veteran soldier community.

The study found LGB soldiers are twice as likely to develop problems with alcohol and five times as likely to show signs of PTSD.

 Gay soldiers are also more likely to show a range of illnesses at once.

Cochran said: ‘On the other hand, a large percentage of LGB veterans (60.5%) thought that their experiences were more difficult than those of their heterosexual peers.

‘Similarly, 68.7% said that they were constantly trying to conceal their sexual orientation while in the service. This concealment was related to current symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

‘Given that 19.5% of LGB veterans in our study indicated that they were discharged due to their sexual orientation, the consequences of being out during DADT were clearly dire for many service members.’



Researchers now believe the next step is to stop harassment and victimization experienced by soldiers in the military.

Under DADT, being gay was considered ‘incompatible with the army’, the US Department of Defence said in 1982. Opponents of repealing DADT were concerned out gay people would undermine morality and effectiveness in the army.





If a soldier was discharged for being gay, they would not receive separation pay. While they served, they and their spouses would not receive the benefits afforded to heterosexual couples, like healthcare, social and financial support.



Gay soldiers who do not reveal their sexuality while in service are more likely to attempt suicide, a study has found.

Researchers at the University of Montana and other institutions found compared to their straight counterparts, lesbian, gay and bisexual soldiers in the closet are more likely to be depressed, have anxiety disorders and take drugs.

From 1981 to 2011, the US anti-gay policy Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) said gay people should not serve openly in the military, but the effects are still affecting thousands of people.

Bryan Cochran, a contributing scientist, told GSN the problem with having LGB soldiers in the military was not the people themselves, but the harrassment they experienced.

Actual suicide attempts in LGB soldiers is 14.7%, compared to 0.0003% for the entire veteran soldier community.

The study found LGB soldiers are twice as likely to develop problems with alcohol and five times as likely to show signs of PTSD.

 Gay soldiers are also more likely to show a range of illnesses at once.

Cochran said: ‘On the other hand, a large percentage of LGB veterans (60.5%) thought that their experiences were more difficult than those of their heterosexual peers.

‘Similarly, 68.7% said that they were constantly trying to conceal their sexual orientation while in the service. This concealment was related to current symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

‘Given that 19.5% of LGB veterans in our study indicated that they were discharged due to their sexual orientation, the consequences of being out during DADT were clearly dire for many service members.’



Researchers now believe the next step is to stop harassment and victimization experienced by soldiers in the military.

Under DADT, being gay was considered ‘incompatible with the army’, the US Department of Defence said in 1982. Opponents of repealing DADT were concerned out gay people would undermine morality and effectiveness in the army.





If a soldier was discharged for being gay, they would not receive separation pay. While they served, they and their spouses would not receive the benefits afforded to heterosexual couples, like healthcare, social and financial support.



– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/node/8030#sthash.Gshnlh9g.dpuf

Gay soldiers who do not reveal their sexuality while in service are more likely to attempt suicide, a study has found.

Researchers at the University of Montana and other institutions found compared to their straight counterparts, lesbian, gay and bisexual soldiers in the closet are more likely to be depressed, have anxiety disorders and take drugs.

From 1981 to 2011, the US anti-gay policy Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) said gay people should not serve openly in the military, but the effects are still affecting thousands of people.

Bryan Cochran, a contributing scientist, told GSN the problem with having LGB soldiers in the military was not the people themselves, but the harrassment they experienced.

Actual suicide attempts in LGB soldiers is 14.7%, compared to 0.0003% for the entire veteran soldier community.

The study found LGB soldiers are twice as likely to develop problems with alcohol and five times as likely to show signs of PTSD.

 Gay soldiers are also more likely to show a range of illnesses at once.

Cochran said: ‘On the other hand, a large percentage of LGB veterans (60.5%) thought that their experiences were more difficult than those of their heterosexual peers.

‘Similarly, 68.7% said that they were constantly trying to conceal their sexual orientation while in the service. This concealment was related to current symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

‘Given that 19.5% of LGB veterans in our study indicated that they were discharged due to their sexual orientation, the consequences of being out during DADT were clearly dire for many service members.’



Researchers now believe the next step is to stop harassment and victimization experienced by soldiers in the military.

Under DADT, being gay was considered ‘incompatible with the army’, the US Department of Defence said in 1982. Opponents of repealing DADT were concerned out gay people would undermine morality and effectiveness in the army.





If a soldier was discharged for being gay, they would not receive separation pay. While they served, they and their spouses would not receive the benefits afforded to heterosexual couples, like healthcare, social and financial support.

Gay soldiers who do not reveal their sexuality while in service are more likely to attempt suicide, a study has found.

Researchers at the University of Montana and other institutions found compared to their straight counterparts, lesbian, gay and bisexual soldiers in the closet are more likely to be depressed, have anxiety disorders and take drugs.

From 1981 to 2011, the US anti-gay policy Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) said gay people should not serve openly in the military, but the effects are still affecting thousands of people.

Bryan Cochran, a contributing scientist, told GSN the problem with having LGB soldiers in the military was not the people themselves, but the harrassment they experienced.

Actual suicide attempts in LGB soldiers is 14.7%, compared to 0.0003% for the entire veteran soldier community.

The study found LGB soldiers are twice as likely to develop problems with alcohol and five times as likely to show signs of PTSD.

 Gay soldiers are also more likely to show a range of illnesses at once.

Cochran said: ‘On the other hand, a large percentage of LGB veterans (60.5%) thought that their experiences were more difficult than those of their heterosexual peers.

‘Similarly, 68.7% said that they were constantly trying to conceal their sexual orientation while in the service. This concealment was related to current symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

‘Given that 19.5% of LGB veterans in our study indicated that they were discharged due to their sexual orientation, the consequences of being out during DADT were clearly dire for many service members.’



Researchers now believe the next step is to stop harassment and victimization experienced by soldiers in the military.

Under DADT, being gay was considered ‘incompatible with the army’, the US Department of Defence said in 1982. Opponents of repealing DADT were concerned out gay people would undermine morality and effectiveness in the army.





If a soldier was discharged for being gay, they would not receive separation pay. While they served, they and their spouses would not receive the benefits afforded to heterosexual couples, like healthcare, social and financial support.



– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/node/8030#sthash.Gshnlh9g.dpuf

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