CNN commentator Roland Martin meets with GLAAD

Both say they now have 'better understanding' of Martin's Super Bowl tweets

CNN commentator Roland Martin meets with GLAAD
15 February 2012

The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation met with embattled CNN commenator Roland Martin Tuesday (14 February) to discuss a Twitter controversy that occurred on Super Bowl Sunday and resulted in Martin being suspended from the cable network.

GLAAD's Herndon Graddick, the group's senior director of programs, met with Martin in Los Angeles where the political commentator arrived on Monday.

'The introduction is the beginning of an open and honest dialogue,' GLAAD said in a statement. 'Both parties came away with a better understanding of one another and look forward to continuing this dialogue.'

GLAAD has been calling for Martin's firing for tweets he wrote during the Super Bowl about an H&M advertisement featuring soccer star David Beckham.

They included: 'Ain't no real bruhs going to H&M to buy some damn David Beckham underwear.'

He also tweeted to his more than 95,000 followers: 'If a dude at your Super Bowl party is hyped about David Beckham's H&M underwear ad, smack the ish out of him!'

GLAAD said the Super Bowl incident is part of a pattern of 'anti-LGBT rhetoric' from Martin and not simply a mistake made on Twitter.

CNN did not immediately comment on the controversy but on 8 February said the tweets were 'regrettable and offensive' and that Martin would not be appearing on their airwaves for the time being.

But according to his Twitter feed, Martin is keeping plenty busy. He appeared on BBC this week to discuss President Barack Obama's budget proposal and is in town to attend Friday's NAACP Image Awards where he is a two-time past winner and a nominee for the fifth time.

Martin had issued two separate apologies last week. The second apology read in part: 'As someone who has spoken out forcefully against bigotry against African Americans and other minorities, as well as sexism against women, I fully understand how a group who has been unfairly treated would be offended by such comments, and, again, I am sorry for any offense my remarks caused.'

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