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Connecticut gay teen is crowned school’s Prom Queen and the students go wild

Danbury High student Nasir Fleming was cheered by his fellow students when he took out the title as Prom Queen at his school dance on Friday night – becoming the first ever male at the school to take the title
Nasir Fleming
Photo by YouTube

Things went wild in a good way when openly gay Danbury, Connecticut teen Nasir Fleming was named Prom Queen on Friday night – becoming the first male Prom Queen in the school’s history.

Nasir, who had also been nominated for Prom King, was cheered and applauded by his fellow students from Danbury High School as he accepted the tiara at the school’s dance at the Matrix Center on Friday night.

Nasir said he wanted to be Prom Queen to support transgender equality even though he is not transgender himself.

‘Even though I identify as male, winning this title is a statement against transphobia,’ Nasir wrote on YouTube in posting his fellow students’ reactions.

‘As gay people, more or less, are becoming accepted in society, transgendered people are still discriminated against severely. If I can win a title that is outside of my gender, there is no reason why a trans-person should have any problems winning titles in his/her gender (Prom Queen, Miss America, etc). Stop the hate, start the love.’

Nasir’s win was welcomed online by a former Danbury student.

‘I'm a Christian but I know that kid,’ she wrote, ‘He's actually a really great and amazing person and really well liked at our school.’

‘So I'm glad he won. And now I love my old high school even more.’

Watch the students’ reaction below

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Keith, "Making him the Prom Queen still makes him appear inferior to other males."
Isn't this the more insidious problem? That a man like you—a spokesperson for equality—can brush past this without comment is worrying in itself. Yes, the grouping together of gay men and women is a problem because it’s a confusion of definition; but the linking of femininity with inferiority is even more dangerous because its a confusion of value. In saying that awarding a gay man 'prom king' would make him 'equal to his fellow males', you suggest that being prom 'queen' isn’t equal to them. Whether or not you believe that the title 'queen' is necessarily inferior to any male identifier is irrelevant. Here, you admit that 'other males' would make this connection but make no objection to it. Equality is equality: we all have to remember that sexual or gender identifiers are always equal, and so be more careful that in standing for one group of oft-misunderstood people, we don't create binaries (like masculine/feminine or male/female, or indeed straight/gay) with values or rank attached to them.