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French Larousse dictionary sparks row by including gays in 'marriage' definition

The right-wing party UMP attacks the leading French dictionary for including same-sex partners in the definition of marriage
The Larousse French dictionary has redefined marriage to include gay and lesbian couples.

The French right-wing party UMP has attacked the Larousse dictionary for its new definition of ‘marriage’.

In the new edition of the 2014 dictionary, which will be published in June, marriage is a ‘solemn act between two same-sex or different-sex persons, who decide to establish a union’.

According to the commentators, Larousse’s move comes after the new French marriage law, which is being discussed at the National Assembly.

The new law is going to guarantee same-sex marriage to same-sex couples and has been passed by the National Assembly and Senate, despite being rejected by the right-wing parties.

Speaking with the television channel Canal+, the vice president of UMP Laurent Wauquiez has said today: ‘It’s incredible, this is not normal, the law has not passed yet.

‘I’m a member of parliament, I believe in what I do and I find it incredible.

‘I studied politics and social sciences on their books. I can’t believe they are doing this,’ the former minister added.

Larousse’s move was announced by the UMP member of parliament Hervé Mariton. Speaking with a journalist working for Matin, he said: ‘Larousse is anticipating the parliament’s work.

‘The law has not passed yet. And it would be honorable not to make it pass.’

Gay Star News contacted Larousse but they refused to comment.

UPDATE: Larousse has now issued a statement to GSN, saying they are not interfering in the debate on marriage in France.

They add: 'It [the definition change] corresponds only to the factual record of the enlargement of the legal concept of marriage in a number of countries (six countries of the European Union) that now recognize marriage between persons of the same sex.

'In doing so, far from interfering in the parliamentary debate in France and in prejudging the outcome, the Larousse publishing fit into their strict encyclopedic work.'

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