LGBTI global news 24-7

Gay football player kicked off team for kissing boyfriend speaks out

'If I could hear one thing, I would love to hear the school say they were wrong'

It's been two weeks since Jamie Kuntz outed himself during a football game between his team, North Dakota State College of Science, and Snow College in Pueblo, Colorado, by kissing his boyfriend.

Since then, he's been kicked off of the team by the coach, dropped out of school, and finds himself in the glare of the media spotlight for the first time in his life.

'I feel like there's so much pressure riding on me,' Kuntz says in an interview with SB Nation. 'I feel like I'm standing up for all the gays that play sports. I'm not going to apologize for bringing him up there, I'm not going to apologize for what I did.'

Kuntz, 18, was sitting the game out over Labor Day weekend because of a concussion and instead was helping to film the game from the press box. Sitting next to him was his 65-year-old boyfriend. At one point during the game, Kuntz leaned over and gave his boyfriend a brief kiss which was witnessed by some of his teammates.

After they got back to school, head coach Chuck Parsons handed Kuntz a letter and said he was kicking him off the team because what he did was 'detrimental' to the team and he was a 'distraction.''

The coach wrote that Kuntz was being kicked off the team 'solely on the basis of your conduct during the football game' and for lying about it.

The teenager's mother found out her son is gay when sometime after the game, Kuntz changed the bio on his Twitter account from 'football player' to 'gay football player.'

Rita Kuntz does not seem to have a problem with her son being gay, but the 37-year age difference between him and the boyfriend does give her pause.

'I think even if it was an 18-year-old girl and a 60-year-old man,' she says. 'It has nothing to do that it's a gay relationship, but the age difference bothers me.'

Her son hopes to resume classes at another school this spring but isn't sure how football will fit into his future: 'I know in my mind I am good enough to be a Division I athlete. There's has to be one school that's willing to take a shot.'

As for his former school, he wants nothing except for this: 'If I could hear one thing, I would love to hear the school say they were wrong.'

Comment on a news story