Gays have more ‘masculine’ faces than straight men

Study researchers claim gay men have ‘wider and shorter faces, smaller and shorter noses, and rather massive and more rounded jaws’

Gays have more ‘masculine’ faces than straight men
08 November 2013

A new study has found gay men have more ‘masculine’ faces than straights.

Researchers from the Center for Theoretical Study at Charles University in Prague and The Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic claimed there were ‘significant’ differences.

They claimed gay men are more likely to have ‘wider and shorter faces, smaller and shorter noses, and rather massive and more rounded jaws’.

The study authors believe it undermines the stereotype of gay men looking more feminine.

In the first part, researchers looked at the morphological differences between gay and straight men.

In the second part, the team looked at whether an individual’s sexual orientation can be correctly determined solely based on facial features.

The team, led by Jarka Valentova, recruited 40 gay and 40 straight white, Czech men for the first study and 33 gay and 33 straight men aged in their early 20s for the second.

Over 11,000 coordinates were established to allow for comparison using geometric morphometrics.

80 students, an even split of male and female, were then asked to rate the sexual orientation of the 66 participants in the second study by ranking their masculinity or femininity on a scale on one to seven.

One indicated very masculine and seven indicated very feminine.

The students were unable to correctly identify sexual orientation from just looking at the face, but did deem the gay men’s faces to be more masculine.

‘Sexual orientation judgment based on stereotyped gender specific traits leads to frequent misjudgement,’ the authors concluded.

They stressed the study would need to be replicated within different ethnic groups and in bigger sample sizes in order to strengthen the validity.

‘Our results showed that differences in facial morphology of homosexual and heterosexual men do not simply mirror variation in femininity,’ the authors added.

‘The stereotypic association of feminine looking men as homosexual may confound judgments of sexual orientation.’

GSN decided to conduct our own little test by comparing gay actor Zachary Quinto and his straight brother Joe. And, uh, we concluded…maybe? Science!

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