Irish trans people’s right to their identity delayed by a year

 The Transgender Equality Network Ireland are urging supporters to take action after being refused right to request new birth certificates

Irish trans people’s right to their identity delayed by a year
30 April 2013

Transgender people will have to wait another year before their real identity is recognized, after Ireland’s Gender Recognition Bill was delayed.

The Republic of Ireland’s bill has been pushed back to 2014 and the Transgender Eqaulity Network Ireland (TENI) is calling for supporters to take action.

The bill is awaiting approval from the Irish parliament’s Heads of Bill. Pushing it back down the legislative agenda has been branded a breach of human rights.

Its passing will make it legal for Irish transgender citizens to request a new birth certificate stating their new gender identity.

TENI are urging allies of the transgender community to send letters to Minister for Social Protection, Joan Burton.

Community members are being asked to request new certificates from the country’s Registrar General.

‘Some people have waited five and a half years and are being denied their human rights,’ said Dr Orlaith O’Sullivan, TENI’s Campaigns and Advocacy Manager.

‘We are partnered with Transgender Europe who have sent a petition to the government already.

‘We are calling for people from all over the world to send their messages of support to make the government listen.’

A letter from Transgender Europe sent to its members today (30 April), was forwarded to Gay Star News by Dr O’Sullivan.

‘You might remember that the Irish Minister for Social Protection Joan Burton TD addressed the council and promised the introduction of legal gender recognition very soon,’ it said.

‘Still, nothing has happened since!

‘TENI is now calling for international support in their new campaign Act Now.’

The UN Human Rights Committee expressed its concern at Ireland’s lack of legislation on gender identity in 2008.

‘It is deeply frustrating and saddening that this issue is not resolved,’ said Vanessa Lacey, TENI Health and Education officer.

‘I am entitled to my birth certificate stating my true gender, which I have requested but not received. How long more?’

To get involved in the Act Now campaign, all information can be found on the TENI website.

Lydia Foy was the first Irish transgender woman to request a corrected birth certificate in 1993.

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