Log Cabin Republicans and Barney Frank defend their respective insults

Gay conservatives and gay Democratic congressman continue war of words

Log Cabin Republicans and Barney Frank defend their respective insults
12 September 2012

Barney Frank, the first openly gay US congressman in history, has not backed off his harsh words for gays who belong to the Log Cabin Republicans.

Last week, Frank drew a strong response from the group’s leadership after he labeled them ‘Uncle Toms.’

He is not backing off from those sentiments and has released a statement which reads in part: ‘This election is clearly one in which there is an extremely stark contrast between the two parties on LGBT rights.  The Democratic President and platform fully embrace all of the legal issues we are seeking to resolve in favor of equality.  The Republican candidate for President and the platform on which he runs vehemently oppose us in all cases.  On the face of this, for a group of largely LGBT people to work for our strong opponent against our greatest ally is a betrayal of any supposed commitment to our legal equality.’

Log Cabin Republicans executive director R. Clarke Cooper has quickly struck back: ‘Congressman Frank, of all people, should understand the importance of perseverance when working within a party to achieve change – after all, it was not so long ago his party was indifferent at best when it came to respecting gay families.’

‘Leaders committed to LGBT equality know that every victory our community has achieved has required bipartisan advocacy and bipartisan votes, and winning support from Republicans will only be more important in the days ahead,’ Cooper added. ‘Come January, Republicans will maintain a majority in the House and likely secure a majority in the Senate. Without Log Cabin Republicans working with fellow conservatives, LGBT Americans would be left without a credible voice within the GOP. Barney Frank’s denial of Log Cabin Republicans success, particularly on ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ repeal and the freedom to marry in New York, is sad but unsurprising. It is time for him to pass on the baton to leaders better suited to a world where equality is not a partisan issue.’

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