New Human Rights Campaign head Chad Griffin takes on critics on Chick-fil-A

'It’s something, actually, we have spent a significant amount of time on'

New Human Rights Campaign head Chad Griffin takes on critics on Chick-fil-A
20 August 2012 Print This Article

It’s been two months since Chad Griffin began his job as president of the Human Rights Campaign, the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender advocacy group in the US with more than one million members and supporters.

In an interview with Michelangelo Signorile posted Monday (20 August), Griffin responded to several criticisms including the tense relationship HRC continues to have with other LGBT groups, HRC’s perceived lack of visibility in the Chick-fil-A controversy, and Griffin’s lack of contact with the LGBT media so far.

On Chick-fil-A: ‘It’s something, actually, we have spent a significant amount of time on. It’s something we communicated with our more than a million members on. … So my view, as it relates to Chick-fil-A, and what I think is really important – and I’m not sure we were fully successful in this, and I think we could do more on this subject – it’s not just [Chick-fil-A president Don Cathy’s] views on marriage equality. But he, in particular, takes his customers’ money and in turn supports organizations, including those that advertise to parents that they can convert their LGBT children into straight youth. And that has horrendous consequences and, quite frankly, tragic consequences. I certainly spent a significant amount of time, as did the staff, on Chick-fil-A, and you make the point that perhaps I could have, should have, spent more time on it.’

On strained relations with other LGBT groups: ‘There’s no question we can always do better when it comes to partnerships. It’s something I’ve committed myself to. What we as a movement have to be able to do better is our ability to work together and coordinate. [HRC] can always do better and we can always improve.’

On lack of availability to LGBT media: ‘I’m only two months on the job. I will be more available. I’m thrilled to be here (with Signorile) today and talking to you today and I intend to do this a lot more.’

Prior to taking over at HRC, Griffin founded the American Foundation for Equal Rights which sponsored the federal lawsuit that resulted in the courts overturning Prop. 8, a voter-approved initiative which banned gay marriage in the state of California.

HAVE YOUR SAY

MORE TOP STORIES

No thumbnail available
No thumbnail available

Bisexual MP Simon Hughes: ‘Marriage is between a man and a woman’

Deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats has voiced his concern with the England and Wales equal marriage bill
No thumbnail available

Australian marriage leaders call for change

Carl Katter says Jesus would ‘hang out’ with pro-gay church while Vietnam veteran also calls for same-sex marriage
No thumbnail available
No thumbnail available

Chad Griffin ready to take Human Rights Campaign to 'next level'

New HRC President 'will work every single day to achieve' full equality for younger generation
No thumbnail available

Sex scenes are no problem, US go-go dancer turned actor tells GSN

One of the stars of film Getting Go, Matthew Camp plays a go-go dancer and tells us why sex scenes are a breeze for him
No thumbnail available

Is this what gay guys do when straight guys aren't around?

This video has to be seen to be believed
No thumbnail available

Alan Cumming in musical night for global rights

Scottish actor will put on intimate music night at XL Nightclub in New York for the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission
No thumbnail available

Man finds out brother is gay on Reddit. It could have been awkward, but it wasn’t

Giving someone your username to a social news website might not be the best idea if you're closeted, but thankfully it didn't end badly...
No thumbnail available

Why Women’s Aid is no safe haven for trans staff

Feminist charity Women’s Aid is demanding transgender staff ‘prove’ their gender before being allowed to work, highlighting problems with UK law