Pomeroy mayor resigns after harassment of gay police officer made public

The mayor of a small town in Idaho has resigned after her Police Chief went public to complain of her alleged homophobic harassment of one of his officers

Pomeroy mayor resigns after harassment of gay police officer made public
10 February 2013

The mayor of the small Ohio town of Pomeroy has resigned after the town’s Chief of Police went public over her alleged harassment of one of his officers.

Mayor Mary McAngus resigned after the Columbus Dispatch reported that Police Chief Mark E Proffitt had drafted a six page signed statement in which he detailed how McAngus had harassed part time police officer Kyle Calendine – calling him a ‘queer’ and trying to get him denied a full time position with Pomeroy Police.

Proffitt’s statement stated that McAngus had told him, ‘I don’t want a queer working for the village, I might be old fashioned but I don’t like it.’

Pomeroy local government administrator Paul Helman also provided a signed statement to the town council in which he detailed how McAngus had sought to have Calendine’s boyfriend barred from visiting him at work.

‘Mary began telling me that we had a gay guy working in the police department and she had to run off Kyle’s boyfriend,’ Hellman wrote.

Following the negative publicity over the Columbus Dispatch story, McAngus drafted a resignation letter and delivered it to the town council.

The resignation letter did not reference the alleged harassment but stated it had been a pleasure to serve as the town’s mayor for 14 months.

Calendine told the Columbus Dispatch that he was happy with McAngus’ decision to resign but an apology would have been nice as well.

‘I am who I am, and I won’t apologize for how I live my life,’ Calendine said, ‘I just want to do my job.’

Police Chief Proffitt praised Calendine’s work ethic and commitment to the job.

‘Kyle Calendine would lay down his life for anyone in need,’ Proffitt told the newspaper.

‘This is a win for Kyle, for our department and for the gay community. It lets people know that no matter what, we’re all in this together.’

Ohio state law bans discrimination on the grounds of sexuality in government jobs. However privately owned businesses in Ohio can still discriminate as they please.

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