Rupert Everett: ‘Sport and showbiz are still anti-gay’

Rupert Everett has claimed homophobia is still very much present in sport, due to the lack of gay athletes and torch bearers in the Olympics.

Rupert Everett: ‘Sport and showbiz are still anti-gay’
09 October 2012

Rupert Everett has claimed the lack of gay athletes and torch bearers in the Olympics reflects how homophobia is still very much present in sport.

The 53-year-old actor, best known for his role in My Best Friend’s Wedding, criticised the lack of gay people that took part in the Games, arguing that the commentators failed to discuss an openly gay person.

Everett said: ‘You listened to the commentary and they would say "this is a mother…this is someone else." But they never said "this is an openly homosexual person."’

Everett, who was promoting the second volume of his memoirs at the Times Cheltenham Literature Festival yesterday (8 October), suggested actors and sportsmen alike often try to hide their sexuality.

‘Sport and showbiz are still very homophobic and it’s strange that no-one has noticed,’ he added.

Clare Balding, a presenter for BBC Sport who is a lesbian, was involved in the torch relay however, casting a shaddow over Everett’s beliefs.

He then went on to blame not just businessmen in Hollywood but also the media for promoting straight relationships and children.

‘If you want to get to the top in Hollywood it’s essential not to be gay,’ he added.

There have been two well-known cases in which sportsmen have come out including Gareth Thomas, the former Wales rugby captain, who hit the headlines in 2009.

Before this was footballer Justin Fashanu, who came out in 1990 but committed suicide eight years later after a 17-year-old boy claimed he had been sexually assaulted by the star.

Everett’s comments follow his controversial outburst last month when he drew criticism from gay rights groups whilst speaking about same-sex parents.

He said in an interview: ‘I can’t think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads. Some people might not agree with that. Fine! That’s just my opinion.’

The actor, who came out 20 years ago, has urged others in the industry not to come out for fear of losing work, claiming that in 2009 his homosexuality damaged his career.

HAVE YOUR SAY

MORE TOP STORIES

No thumbnail available

ENDA passes full US Senate in historic vote

After 64-32 vote, attention now turns to House where Republican leadership expected to let legislation die
No thumbnail available

Gay Korean feature film released this week

Two Weddings and a Funeral is a comedy about a marriage between a gay man and a lesbian
No thumbnail available

Adam Lambert supports Sam Smith after his coming out

Gay American Idol star says he has met with the British singer-songwriter to give him advice
No thumbnail available

Three UK thugs found guilty over anti-gay attack

Gang met the victim online and they invited him over for drinks. Once the victim showed up, the gang brutally beat him
No thumbnail available

Poll: 58% of Americans want US Supreme Court to legalize gay marriage nationwide

Support particularly strong among young voters, Democrats and people with postgraduate education
No thumbnail available

Brandon Routh still laments his gay role in TV sitcom being cut short

One-time Superman hopes all 13 episodes of Partners will be made available for fans
No thumbnail available

Colombian Catholic priest's gay partner wins his pension

The Constitutional Court of Colombia makes history by ordering that a Catholic priest's secret partner of 28 years is entitled to pension rights - despite vow of chastity
No thumbnail available

Bologna Pride to remember Italy's earthquake victims

Organizers decided to march but the pride celebrations will be toned down, to respect the 17 dead and 350 wounded
No thumbnail available

Matt Dallas comes out, announces engagement

Actor is best known for playing title role in ABC Family series Kyle XY
No thumbnail available

Nepal govt shoves gays out of crucial HIV meet

Rife corruption in interim government sees WHO funds misused to turn Bangkok meet into junket for officials