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Scientists discover male squids off the coast of California are completely bisexual

Using remotely operated vehicles, scientists observing male squids deep in the ocean off the coast of California have discovered they are as likely to have sex with each other as they are with females

Scientists discover male squids off the coast of California are completely bisexual
Photo by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Scientists observed the squids' sexual behavior using remotely controlled vehicles

Scientists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California have published research on the sexual behavior of male squids of the species Octopoteuthis deletron and are reporting that they are as likely to have sex with each other as they are with females of their species.

When squids mate they use a modified arm to glue sperm packets to their partners and the scientists, using remotely operated vehicles, found that of 19 squids that they could identify as having recently mated with a male, nine were male, while ten were female.

Same-sex activity has been documented in other squid and octopus species but this is the first time that such a high level of same-sex sexual behavior has been found in a cephalopod species.

Octopoteuthis deletron are red and white colored squids that grow to a total length of about 16 inches and inhabit the Monterey Submarine Canyon at a depth of 400 to 800 meters (1,300 feet to a half mile).

Researchers have suggested a few different reasons why these squids might not be discriminate in the sex of their sexual partners partners.

These squid leave solitary lives so having a quick sexual encounter with any squid they meet could give them a better chance of reproducing.

Others have suggested that a speedy and indiscriminate sexual encounter may be a way for the squids to avoid being trapped in a cannibalistic encounter.

Or maybe they just enjoy it.


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