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Skyfall screenwriter says homoerotic scene doesn't mean James Bond is bisexual

007 seems to hint in scene with Javier Bardem that he's had same-sex experience

A homoerotically-charged scene in the new film Skyfall features a villain named Silva (Javier Bardem) caressing the chest of James Bond (Daniel Craig) as 007 is tied up.

Bond responds to the move by saying: 'What makes you think this is my first time?'

This has led to speculation that Bond is bisexual.

But screenwriter John Logan tells The Hollywood Reporter that's not necessarily the case.

'Some people claim it’s because I’m, in fact, gay but not true at all,' Logan said at the New York City premiere of the film which opens in the US Friday (9 November). '(Director) Sam (Mendes) and I were discussing, there were so many scenes where Bond goes mano-a-mano with the villain, whether it’s Dr. No or Goldfinger or whatever, and there’s been so many ways to do a cat-and-mouse and intimidate Bond, and we thought, what would truly make the audience uncomfortable is sexual intimidation; playing the sort of homoerotic card that is sort of always there subtextually with characters like Scaramanga in Man With the Golden Gun or Dr. No. So we just decided that we should play the card and enjoy it.'

Both Craig and Bardem talked about the scene in separate press conferences last month.

'What are you going to do?' Craig said, getting a laugh from the crowd. Then he added: 'I don't see the world in sexual divisions.' As far as Silva's sexuality, Craig said: 'Someone suggested that Silva may be gay. And I'm like, I think he'll fuck anything.' Then Craig described the scene as 'a great flirt.' 'It the right thing to say, and that way that Javier plays it is so great. He plays it for real, and he plays it to the limit. He never forgets that he's playing a Bond villain. I love that scene. It makes me laugh. I hope it makes you laugh.'

Bardem was asked how Silva's sexuality informed his portrayal.

'It was part of the game, but it’s not entirely the game,' he said. 'You can read anything that you want or wish. But it was more about putting the other person in a very uncomfortable situation where even James Bond doesn't know how to get out of it.'

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