UK lawyer urges Jamaica to keep buggery laws

Paul Diamond believes Jamaica should resist pressure from the US or UK to remove buggery laws
 

UK lawyer urges Jamaica to keep buggery laws
25 November 2012

A UK lawyer says Jamaica shouldn’t give into UK or US pressure to review its buggery laws.

British barrister Paul Diamond accuses the United Kingdom of failing ‘to find a balance between religious rights and the secular modern human-rights agenda’.

Diamond’s website reveals he specializes in the law of religious liberty.

According to Jamaican newspaper the Sunday Gleaner, Diamond also accuses the UK of ‘failing to honor the rights of its own citizens’ and ‘discrimination against Christians’.

Diamond wrote: ‘Christians in the United Kingdom have sustained detriment in their employment for wearing crosses; for making any comment of opposition to the homosexual lifestyle; for offering to pray for someone (even if refused) or for asking for conscientious exemption to assisting in same-sex marriages’.

Diamond encouraged Jamaica to consider its sovereignty, asserting that the UK and the US coercively use visas and economic aid as tools to drive a human rights agenda that includes the country’s buggery laws.

GSN interviewed three leading Jamaican gay activists to learn more about the current legal challenge being pursued against buggery laws.

J-FLAG, the Jamaican Forum for Lesbians, All-sexuals and Gays is mounting a legal challenge in the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, part of the Organization of American States, using the case of a gay Jamaican Gareth Henry who was forced to get asylum in Canada because of the risk to his life at home.

Newly-elected Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller asserted she would review Jamaica’s buggery laws, which make sodomy punishable with up to ten years in jail.

Jamaica is seen as one of the most homophobic countries in the world with reports of mob violence, police complicity and hate speech in music. 

HAVE YOUR SAY

MORE TOP STORIES

Olympic body challenge: Let the games begin

Olympic body challenge: Let the games begin

Matthew Jenkin takes on the Maximuscle challenge to get the body of an athlete before the London 2012 Olympic Games
No thumbnail available

Rock musician Linda Perry and talk show host Sara Gilbert are engaged

Perry stages elaborate proposal during romantic picnic at a park
No thumbnail available

Facebook slams fake report claiming it was pulling out of Uganda over anti-gay law

Social media giant was told by gay activists that ceasing operations in Uganda could be a death sentence for young LGBTI teens
No thumbnail available

Hormel uses Facebook to accept Hagel's apology

James Hormel goes to Facebook to announce he accepts Chuck Hagel's apology.
No thumbnail available

Incredible a capella group sings Wizard of Oz with modern songs

Pentatonix, a group with two out members, performs a medley of modern classics celebrating the Judy Garland film
No thumbnail available

Lesbian couple exiled from village in Punjab

Swaran Kaur and Harsharan Kaur banned from village and disinherited by family in northern India
No thumbnail available

No-side concedes defeat in Irish equal marriage referendum

'we offer our congratulations to the YES side on a hard won victory. This is their day, and they should enjoy it.’
No thumbnail available

Former Glee actress Charice comes out as lesbian

Filipino singer and former Glee star Charice Pempengco has come out as a lesbian and has thanked her fans for staying with her
How living in a US gayborhood affects the price of your home

How living in a US gayborhood affects the price of your home

And how might the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage change neighborhoods all over the country?
No thumbnail available

Federal judge rules against Alaska's same-sex marriage ban

'For many years, there have been powerful voices condemning homosexual conduct as immoral, but the Court’s obligation in this case is not to determine or mandate a particular moral code, but rather "to define the liberty of all"'