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19 inspiring women who march for equality after Trump threatens to take it all away

19 inspiring women who march for equality after Trump threatens to take it all away

Married couple, Sheila and Hannah Young (left and middle) at the London Womens March 2017

President Donald Trump is officially inaugurated, the day before millions take part in international Women’s Marches against his presidency.

The main Women’s March was held in Washington D.C., but 673 ‘sister marches’ took place globally.

An estimated 2.5 million people marched worldwide because President Trump is threatening to take away the rights of women in the U.S.

Trump has promised to defund Planned Parenthood and make it harder for women to access health care.

In addition, he’s planning to implement the First Amendment Defense Act to make it legal to discriminate against LGBTI people.

He has also bragged about grabbing a woman ‘by the pussy’, ‘treating them like shit’ and called election rival Hillary Clinton a ‘nasty woman’.

We attended the March in London and spoke to inspiring women who were protesting Trump’s sexist, racist and homophobic attitudes.

We asked one simple question to each: Why are you here today?

1. Lizzy Barrett

‘Everything Trump has said against the LGBTI community, I have felt violated against. This is my right – I deserve marriage and I deserve to be free and be allowed to love whoever I want.’

Lizzy Barrett at the London Womens March 2017
Lizzy Barrett at the London Women’s March 2017

2. Reeta Loi Shaw

‘I’m here because I am standing with other women for women’s equality all over the world.’

Reeta Loi Shaw (left) at the London Womens March 2017
Reeta Loi Shaw (left) at the London Women’s March 2017

3. Barbara Simpkins

‘[Trump’s] a misogynist, a bigot and a liar. I also think he’s a danger to the world.’

Barbara Simpkins at the London Womens Rally 2017
Barbara Simpkins at the London Women’s March 2017

4. Sue Hampton

‘Trump stands for everything that I fear most and object to most, which is a lack of love, a lack of respect for diversity and a dangerous disregard for peace. He is also sexist, homophobic, racist, stupid and very, very dangerous.’

Sue Hampton at the London Womens March 2017
Sue Hampton at the London Women’s March 2017

5. Hannah and Sheila Young

‘Let’s remind the people in power that we’ve still got our rights and freedoms. It’s also not right that someone who is promoting so much hate can be in power.’

Hannah and Sheila Young (left and middle) at the London Womens March 2017
Hannah and Sheila Young (left and middle) at the London Women’s March 2017

6. Sally Pearman and Rebecca Lund

Sally: ‘The biggest concern for me is the high numbers of black trans women being murdered in America that no one seems to be talking about. I also don’t think Trump gives, you know, a ‘rude word’ about that.’

Sally Pearman (left) and Rebecca Lund (right) at the London Womens March 2017
Sally Pearman (left) and Rebecca Lund (right) at the London Women’s March 2017

7. Meryn Cutler and Aoife Doolan

‘It’s important to stand against Trump’s fascism and we’re quite concerned that him getting in is going to lead to a reverse of what we’ve achieved in LGBT+ in the last thirty or so years.’

Meryn Cutler (right) and Aoife Doolan (left) at the London Womens March 2017
Meryn Cutler (right) and Aoife Doolan (left) at the London Women’s March 2017

8. Sian Fogden

‘Because it’s important to show that we don’t support what Trump stands for.’

Sian Fogden (right) at the London Womens March 2017
Sian Fogden (right) at the London Women’s March 2017

9. Sharon Bowen

‘Everyone has to stand up and make their points known.’

Sharon Bowen (right) at the London Womens March 2017
Sharon Bowen (right) at the London Women’s March 2017

10. Maddy Sakakini

‘I’m here because I am upset by the division and hatred in Trump’s campaign and his leadership and I wanted to stand together with everyone and be united against this.’

Maddy Sakakini at the London Womens March 2017
Maddy Sakakini at the London Women’s March 2017

11. Elisabeth Whitebread

‘[We’re] here to stand in solidarity with all my sisters around the world and anyone who’s feeling threatened by Trump’s Presidency.’

Elisabeth Whitebread (bottom right) at the London Womens March 2017
Elisabeth Whitebread (bottom right) at the London Women’s March 2017

12. Gabi Almquist

‘For her. For her future.’

Gabi Almquist at the London Womens March 2017
Gabi Almquist at the London Women’s March 2017

13. Kate Davies and Victoria Fitzpatrick

‘It feels like an incredibly backwards step and I’m very scared for my rights as a gay woman, and for other minorities rights.’

Kate Davies (left) and Victoria Fitzpatrick (right) at the London Womens March 2017
Kate Davies (left) and Victoria Fitzpatrick (right) at the London Women’s March 2017

14. Nia Williamson

‘No matter the creed, colour, the race, the sexuality, we’ve got to actually fight, otherwise we’re going to go downhill.’

Nia Williamson at the London Womens March 2017
Nia Williamson at the London Women’s March 2017

15. Makon Bessala

‘Everybody should have the right to love who they want, be as they are whether they were born that way or not, and have the right and access to free education for all women and rights to equal pay for all women.’

Makon Bessala at the London Womens March 2017
Makon Bessala (left) at the London Women’s March 2017