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Activists turn football shirts into rainbow flag to protest Russian homophobia

Activists turn football shirts into rainbow flag to protest Russian homophobia

The Hidden Flag

Six activists have taken to the streets of Moscow sporting their national football shirts in protest of Russian anti-LGBTI discrimination.

The group combined the colors of their shirts to form the rainbow flag, and creatively subvert laws banning LGBTI ‘propaganda’. The project, named The Hidden Flag, even has its own website.

The Hidden Flag has so far been photographed in as many places around Moscow as possible. Several amusing pictures show them standing in formation next to bemused looking policeman.

The Hidden Flag pose beneath the authorities' noses (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The Hidden Flag pose beneath the authorities’ noses (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The group get some sight-seeing in whilst they protest (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The group get some sight-seeing in whilst they protest (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)

The group explained that since the creation of the rainbow flag 40 years ago, displays of LGBTI pride are still illegal in many countries.

Russia is of course chief among these, and authorities regularly attempt to crush LGBTI activism.

‘That is why, taking advantage of the fact that the country is hosting the World Cup, at the same time that Pride Month is celebrated in the rest of the world, we decided to denounce this situation and take our flag to the streets of Russia,’ says The Hidden Flag (in Spanish).

‘Yes, in broad daylight, in front of the Russian authorities, society and the whole world. With pride.

‘Spain, Holland, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Colombia. Six countries, six courageous LGBTI activists who, together, formed our flag and toured emblematic places of Russia, taking to every corner a fight that will never be silenced.’

The group consists of Marta Márquez (Spain), Eric Houter (Holland), Eloi Pierozan Junior (Brazil), Guillermo León (Mexico), Vanesa Paola Ferrario (Argentina) and Mateo Fernández Gómez (Colombia).

The Hidden Flag take to the streets of Moscow (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The Hidden Flag take to the streets of Moscow (Photo: http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The group risk arrest due to anti-propaganda laws (http://thehiddenflag.org/)
The group risk arrest due to anti-propaganda laws (http://thehiddenflag.org/)

 

Twitter praises The Hidden Flag

People have taken to Twitter to congratulate the group for their bravery.

The 2018 Russia World Cup has so far seen several anti-LGBTI incidents on behalf of various authorities.

Legendary activist Peter Tatchell was arrested and later released for staging a one-man protest against Putin’s failure to act on Chechnya’s persecution of gays.

Representatives of Three Lions Pride were told to take down their pride flag during England’s match against Panama. This was later overruled by Fifa following complaints from the group.

Also on Gay Star News:

Fan told to take down rainbow flag at World Cup match in Russia

Budweiser under fire for sponsoring Russia’s World Cup and Pride events