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How this city-living gay guy found a love of the great outdoors in Scottsdale, Arizona

From hot air ballooning to horse riding, 8 amazing experiences GSN's David Calderon had in the Copper State

How this city-living gay guy found a love of the great outdoors in Scottsdale, Arizona
Pictures by David Calderon
David in front of Scottsdale's skyscape

The state of Arizona, in all its rugged beauty, is staggeringly huge. At 295,254 square km, it’s the sixth largest in the United States.

That said, its entire population is 6.7m – smaller than New York City, believe it or not.

Suffice to say, this is a destination known more for its untamed wilderness and natural wonders that its cosmopolitan culture.

But having lived in London and LA, I find this hugely refreshing. Here, a love of the great outdoors is prerequisite; getting your hands dirty (or at least your shoes) is a given.

During my recent visit, I finding the right base was key. I’d suggest the city of Scottsdale, Arizona (population: 227,000). It offers a wealth of comfortable hotels and delicious restaurants, but best of all, a number of outdoorsy activities to enjoy less than a ten-minute car ride away.

But before I get to that, here’s the big daddy of bucket list experiences you can tick off, by simply hopping on a plane from Scottsdale for just 75 minutes…

1 Fly over the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon’s majesty cannot be missed. If you want to fully comprehend its grandness then you need to jump in a plane.

Westward Air Services provide a narrated flight that takes off from Phoenix/Scottsdale area and flies you over the Red Rocks of Sedona, and the Canyon itself.

Aerial view of the Grand Canyon.

Aerial view of the Grand Canyon.

Once airborne, size can be fully appreciated. It’s 277 miles long and up to 18 miles wide, with a depth of over a mile. Its unique appearance is due to the carving out by the Colorado River that flows through Arizona.

I was in awe as I saw all the scenic views from my own personal side window. Oddly enough, I was traveling in December, and surprised to find the the Canyon actually gets snowy and icy at times. The white-tipped peaks gave the canyon even more beauty and depth. 

A small plane indeed.

A small plane indeed.

Be aware that the planes are small. Ours fitted 10 people very comfortably, but the journey wasn’t as stable as I’m used to – you’re constantly reminded you’re in the air because of the plane’s movements due to winds. But this is to be expected. If turbulence scares you, then you might struggle a little. I remember holding tight to my seat a few times, but found the experience exhilarating. 

2 Descend into the Grand Canyon

As you descend into the Canyon, via the Kaibab Trail, you feel like you’re walking into a painted canvas. It was amazing to see the rangers riding mules back and forth along the trail, depositing dirt to keep the trails walkable.

A view from the top!

A view from the top!

Arizona Outback Adventures provide knowledgable guides. Ask for Denny, who will take you on your journey through the valley.

During the trail hike, Denny took us along all the best picture-taking spots, while giving us history on the Canyon. For example, did you know its formation dates as far back as 70 million years?

Ooh...Aah...

Ooh…Aah…

3 Ride a hot air balloon

I was extraordinarily nervous about riding up in a hot air balloon. I say this as a person who’s gone skydiving, but what scared me the most about that was the slow, parachuted descent down. That’s why I was nervous about going in a hot air ballon. The thought of going up slowly only to be stuck high in the air for an hour was enough to give me pause.

But I’m so happy I did it. I rode with Hot Air Expeditions and I was astounded by the all-encompassing views. I expected a gust of wind to send me ducking for cover. But luckily that never happened. Our guide was informative and charming. His hot air balloon motto was, ‘we like to get it hot and we like to get it up.’ The impressive 5000 feet views of the desert and mountains made for a photographer’s paradise.

On top of the world.

On top of the world

I was greeted with a champagne flute after a successful ride. The adrenaline was pumping through my system as I realized I’d overcome my hot air balloon fears. Just go!

4 Hike Camelback Mountain

Camelback Mountain is one of the most prominent landmarks of Scottsdale. That said, the journey up is a laborious one. The hike, with an elevation of 2704 feet, is popular amongst tourists and locals. Camelback Mountain features two trails. Echo Canyon is steeper and Cholla is much longer. I went up the former.

A breather on top of Camelback Mountain.

A breather on top of Camelback Mountain.

This hike is a full-body workout. I found myself crawling and scaling the mountain with my hands at times. But it was fun. I actually felt like a legit mountain climber. I would recommend having a decent size water bottle with you at all times, because Echo Canyon trail isn’t for the faint-hearted.

You will meet plenty of people on your journey up and down the trail because of its popularity. I was greeted by almost every person I passed. The hike allows for plenty of photo ops along the way. The panoramic skyline and beautiful mountain ranges make a wondrous backdrop for photos. At the top you can see the horizon of Scottsdale and even catch downtown Phoenix in the distance.

5 Visit Arizona Cowboy College

Fancy becoming a cowboy? Then get on your horse and head on over to Arizona Cowboy College. Once you enter this ranch you will see all kinds of animals ranging from massive cattle to stunning horses. Make sure to keep your eye out for Myron the pig.

That'll do pig...

That’ll do pig…

At the College you will learn skills such as lassoing, grooming horses, saddling, and even horse riding. But that’s only scratching the surface. You can take either a day session or all the way up to a week. It’s up to how long you want to experience the life of a cowboy on a ranch.

Horse riding was my absolute favorite. My instructor, Mel, showed me how to properly put my saddle on the horse and gave me plenty of tips. 

Learning the ropes...

Learning the ropes…

Once ready I was led into a pen where I got on my horse, Mula. We began riding along the inside circumference of the pen. After going around in circles for a bit I was instructed on how to make my horse trot. Trotting means to make the horse move at a quicker pace. Once I gave Mule a squeeze with my legs he immediately began to quicken his steps and trot along. It was such a rush. I had no fear whatsoever. I enjoyed the quicker pace versus the slow walking. Although, I quickly felt the strain on my legs and groin because of the constant up and down movements in the saddle. You will be sore if it’s your first time riding a horse.

I left Arizona Cowboy College saddened and with a newfound love for horse riding. Giddy up!

6 Hike through The McDowell Sonoran Preserve

The McDowell Sonoran Preserve is a protected area of land that tourists are able to visit to witness Scottsdale’s McDowell Mountains and Sonoran Desert. This hike is more for the scenic views and to get up close and personal with the desert vegetation such as the famous Saguaro cacti. These cacti have a long lifespan with some living well past 150 years and growing over 70 feet tall.

Capturing the desert beauty.

Capturing the desert beauty.

Before you start your hike among any of the numerous trails, check out the Wildflower’s Watch by The McDowell Sonoran Preserve. They list the current wildflowers that are blooming and where you can find them. These trails are a robust nature walk full of plant life that will keep you engulfed in the beauty of mother nature.

7 Visit Cattle Track

Cattle Track is a hidden gem of Scottsdale. Located near downtown by the banks of the Arizona canal, this artists’ compound dates back to the 1930s. Cattle Track is an oasis for writers, photographers, and even a blacksmith. The installation is a piece of art itself, featuring many pieces of art integrated into the structure.

The art of pottery making at Cattle Track.

The art of pottery making at Cattle Track.

Their missions is simple: ‘To recognize and celebrate Scottsdale’s cultural heritage by providing opportunities for artists, craftsmen, and students, visual and performing, individually and collectively, to encourage and enhance their art forms.’

Fritz Scholder, an artist famous for his Native American paintings, and Louise Nevelson, an abstract expressionist, have both had residences at Cattle Track. Philip C. Curtis, the founder of Phoenix Art Musuem, even called Cattle Track home for a time.

8 Tour at Taliesin West

Taliesin West will leave you in a state of astonishment by its antique, architectural grandeur. This landmark lies at the foothills of the McDowell Mountains and is home to The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

Taliesin is Welsh for ‘shining brow’ which is perfect, since it lies on the brow of the McDowell Mountains. Originally the home of Frank Lloyd Wright, until he passed in 1959, this geometrically unique building was created out of the desert itself by using the sand and rocks to keep it in harmonic balance with its surrounding environment.

Taliesin West is a national historic landmark.

Taliesin West is a national historic landmark.

The site is considered to be one of Wright’s greatest masterpieces and during your tour you will be able to delve into Wright’s personal home, drafting studio, garden, and his own personal cabaret room. All of which will showcase the symmetrical design and creativity that Taliesin West was built upon.

Make sure to check out Experience Scottsdale to learn all the unbelievable attractions that are awaiting to be discovered in Scottsdale, Arizona!

Arizona sign pic by Wiki. First Grand Canyon pic by Pixabay.

 


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