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Chinese erotic author jailed for 10 years for writing about gay sex

Chinese erotic author jailed for 10 years for writing about gay sex

Woman writing in book

Chinese authorities sentenced an erotic author to 10 years in prison for writing and selling a novel featuring gay sex scenes.

Liu – better known by her alias Tian Yi – wrote Occupation, a story about a forbidden love affair between a male teacher and his male student.

She posted the novel online and sold over 7,000 copies – making a profit of 150,000 yuan ($21,604, £16,782).

When the People’s Court of Wuhu found out, they sentenced Liu to 10 years in prison on 31 October for producing ‘obscene material’.

They say the gay erotic novel included ‘male homosexual behaviour… including perverted sexual acts like violation and abuse.’

It is believed Liu has filed an appeal to the 10 year sentence, according to the BBC.

Pornography laws in China

In China, producing or circulating pornography is illegal. The sentence for doing so can be life imprisonment.

Despite the well-documented ban on pornography, it’s almost impossible to eradicate online in China.

Authorities have closed down pornographic sites in recent years, but pornographers find ways to publish content.

Weibo
Weibo. | Photo: Jon Russell / Flickr

Earlier this year, China’s most popular social network site announced it was removing gay and violent content across the microblogging site.

In a bid to ‘clean-up’ the site, it deleted pictures, cartoons and text posts, during a three-month removal cleanse.

Weibo a social media platform similar to Twitter, attracting over 392 million monthly active users.

Weibo announced the move on its official administrator’s account. It came about in order to comply with China’s recent cyber security law that calls for strict data surveillance.

The statement specifically mentioned ‘manga and videos with pornographic implications, promoting violence or (related to) homosexuality.’

The social media site then backed down from the gay content ban, after viral social media backlash.

See also:

Victory for LGBT China after Weibo backs down on gay content ban

Chinese censors might not let Moonlight see light of day

Gay filmmaker sues China censors for banning his documentary