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Cynthia Nixon shares story of mother’s abortion to help stop Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation

Cynthia Nixon shares story of mother’s abortion to help stop Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation

Cynthia Nixon

On the first day of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings, New York gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon shared the story of her mother’s abortion to highlight why Kavanaugh should not be confirmed.

Many are concerned Kavanaugh poses a threat to women’s reproductive rights if he becomes the ninth Justice. A big concern is the overturning of Roe v Wade, which legalized abortion.

Nixon, who’s challenging current Governor Andrew Cuomo, told the story in a video on Twitter.

She first revealed her mother got an abortion when it was still illegal in the state. Her mother described it as a ‘really awful experience’.

‘She really didn’t want to talk about it in any detail, but at the same time, I could tell how important it was that she conveyed this information to me.’

Nixon states a part of this that people forget or don’t acknowledge is having to keep such a secret.

‘We can never go back,’ she wrote in the tweet, warning of Kavanaugh’s confirmation and a time when abortion was illegal.

Lack of support from Democrats

Protesters showed up early to the hearings, shouting out against Kavanaugh. Numerous women wore handmaid’s outfits from The Handmaid’s Tale, and several others were arrested.

Kavanaugh is Donald Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee, following Neil Gorsuch. Anthony Kennedy’s seat is now vacant after he announced his retirement earlier this year.

Democrats Senators present at the hearing also did not back down from grilling Kavanaugh.

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker said he couldn’t support Kavanaugh, and encouraged his colleagues not to vote.

‘I cannot support your nomination, not just because of the body of your work, but also the perverse process by which this comes forward,’ he said, referring to the upcoming midterm elections and Robert Mueller’s ongoing investigation.

‘We should not vote now. We should wait. And if we are not waiting, we should object to your nomination.’

Kamala Harris of California, meanwhile, described it as a personal matter for her.

In kindergarten, Harris was part of the second class of students integrated in Berkeley public schools, thanks to Chief Justice Earl Warren and the Brown v Board of Education decision.

‘Had that decision not come down the way it did, I may not have had the opportunities that allowed me to become a lawyer or a prosecutor,’ said said. ‘So for me a Supreme Court seat is not only about academic issues of legal precedent or judicial philosophy, it is personal.’

Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings will continue.

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