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Cynthia Nixon pens amazing op-ed on what it means to ‘be a Miranda’ in 2018

Cynthia Nixon pens amazing op-ed on what it means to ‘be a Miranda’ in 2018

Cynthia Nixon as Miranda

Cynthia Nixon has written an article exploring what it means to ‘be a Miranda’ in 2018.

The actress shot to fame as lawyer Miranda Hobbes in the seminal HBO show Sex and the City, which ran from 1998 to 2004.

The New York City governor candidate penned the op-ed for Refinery29, discussing how her character was under-appreciated back in the day but has been embraced in modern times.

‘Miranda wasn’t loathed, but she wasn’t as aspirational as her girlfriends’

‘To say that someone was “such a Miranda” often meant that they were a type A personality, consumed by their career, or, worse, that they were a killjoy,’ she writes.

She furthermore added: ‘Miranda wasn’t loathed, but she wasn’t nearly as aspirational as her more glamorous girlfriends.’

Cynthia married her female partner Christine Marinoni in 2012. Together they have two children, Charles and Samantha. Cynthia is also a mother to Max, from a previous relationship.

Kristen Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon and Kim Cattrall as the Sex and the City girls | Photo: Sex and the City

‘Feminism can’t (and shouldn’t) succeed without women of color and trans women leading the way’

On what it means to be a Miranda today, she said: ‘It means defining yourself and your life on your own terms, committing to what’s right, and standing up for your sisters.

‘For me, it means taking my passion for justice in all spaces – education and criminal justice reform chief among them – and working to make my home state of New York a better place for all. That’s why I’m running for Governor of New York State.’

With hindsight, the show has come under fire for its lack of inclusivity. Cynthia also touches on this in the op-ed.

‘Miranda’s New York was a very affluent, white slice of our diverse city and state,’ she says. ‘As the feminist movement continues to evolve, our feminism must be intersectional. It can’t (and shouldn’t) succeed without women of color and trans women leading the way.’