Now Reading
Far-right American activist ‘not welcome’ at Hong Kong protests

Far-right American activist ‘not welcome’ at Hong Kong protests

Joey Gibson and his companion in Hong Kong. (Photo: Facebook)

A far-right American activist accused of links to attacks against LGBTI people attended demonstrations in Hong Kong this weekend.

Joey Gibson broadcast his attendance on Facebook.

Hong Kongers launched in unprecedented demonstrations last month as they protest an extradition law.

On Sunday (7 July), more than 200,000 people marched on the streets. At their biggest, protests have attracted two million.

Gibson’s companion marveled at the size of the crowd. She also praised the marchers’ love of freedom.

‘They’re all thanking us for being here’ Gibson’s companion said.

Hong Kong Twitter user, who goes by the handle HongKongHermit, reportedly accosted the pair.

He accused them of ‘trying to co-opt the protest for their own propaganda purposes’. He also told them they are ’not welcome’.

The law under discussion would let authorities remove people accused of a crime to countries without a formal extradition agreement, including mainland China.

Joey Gibson is the leader of Patriot Prayer, based in Portland, Oregon. The group reportedly has incited violence against left-wing groups. It may also behind an uptick in violence against LGBTI people in the city.

Landmark protests in Hong Kong

The law under discussion would let authorities remove people accused of a crime to countries without a formal extradition agreement, including mainland China.

Critics say it would infringe freedom and autonomy in the special administrative region of China.

Although the city’s chief executive promised to shelve the law after mass protests, demonstrators want it completely withdrawn.

China’s courts are considered neither free nor fair. They regularly impede human rights to freedom of speech, assembly, and religion.

The UK handed its former colony back to China in 1997. But, China agreed to govern Hong Kong under ‘one country, two systems’ for 50 years.

Under this system, Hong Kong is not subject to China law and retains its own levels of freedom of the press and free speech.

But, Beijing is increasingly influencing the region. Activists are hitting back demanding greater democracy.

LGBTI activists

Prominent members of Hong Kong’s LGBTI community have led protests in Hong Kong.

The city’s first (and only) openly-gay legislator has attended most marches and shared updates with his followers.

He reported last week that police search his offices after one demonstration.

Pop star Denise Ho – who was one the the first singers in Hong Kong to come out publicly – was scheduled to brief the United Nations on the situation in Hong Kong on Monday.

See also