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From awkward apartment to one of Manhattan’s coolest micro lofts

From awkward apartment to one of Manhattan’s coolest micro lofts

Proof: apartments don't have to have lots of lateral space to feel big and airy.

London, Tokyo, New York – they all share one common issue: space comes at a premium price, with many small apartments snubbed for being too tiny, too crowded or simply shaped weirdly.

Pre-renovation the apartment's main feature was its rather awkward layout.
Pre-renovation the apartment’s main feature was its rather awkward layout.

This apartment in Manhattan is no exemption to that, with its seemingly weird layout, randomly placed staircases and a high ceiling.

The apartment's original structure definitely didn't make the most of the available space.
The apartment’s original structure definitely didn’t make the most of the available space.

Or was, rather, because when Specht Harpman Architects took over and conducted a drastic overhaul, the days of minimum space were over, making way for one a micro loft we imagine makes some of the owner’s neighbors just that little bit jealous.

Ta-da: a radical renovation later, there is no trace left of the tiny home's former look.
Ta-da: a radical renovation later, there is no trace left of the tiny home’s former look.

Measuring just 425 square feet, or 39.5 square meters – that’s about the same space you’d get from one and a half standard 40 foot shipping containers – the apartment definitely feels a lot bigger than it is.

Some of it stems from the flat’s height; the ceiling rises 24 feet (7.32 meters high).

The Micro-Loft utilizes every bit of available space - even under the stairs.
The Micro-Loft utilizes every bit of available space – even under the stairs.

And, as they (probably, but maybe don’t quote us on this) already said in the Roman Empire, if you can’t build it wide, build it high.

Distinct levels allow for a better use of space - and a clear distinction between the 'rooms'.
Distinct levels allow for a better use of space – and a clear distinction between the ‘rooms’.

Built over different levels, the Micro-Loft cleverly exploits the apartment’s unusually high ceiling to create distinct rooms and a flowing interior landscape.

Tucked into a corner, the kitchen gets maximum use out of an awkwardly placed pillar.
Tucked into a corner, the kitchen gets maximum use out of an awkwardly placed pillar.

Four living platforms accommodate everything, from the kitchen to the bedroom, but without making the apartment feel crowded or dark.

Large windows and an open-plan arrangement mean light floods down into the living area.
Large windows and an open-plan arrangement mean light floods down into the living area.

The bed partially hovers over the living space, the bath is ultra-compact so as to fit under the stairs and the kitchen worktop embraces an awkwardly placed pillar, putting every inch to use.

Surprise: from the bedroom, a small staircase leads to a private little roof terrace.
Surprise: from the bedroom, a small staircase leads to a private little roof terrace.

And climbing up, a small surprise reveals itself: a fully-glazed roof terrace, not just letting in plenty of light but offering a small respite from hectic city life at the same time.