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Gay man receives apology from London police after they failed to investigate homophobic abuse

Gay man receives apology from London police after they failed to investigate homophobic abuse

London police failed to investigate homophobic abuse

A gay man has received an apology from the London Metropolitan Police after the force admitted it failed to investigate alleged homophobic abuse.

David Cary, 54, sued the force for discrimination, saying it did not properly investigate allegations he was verbally abused by a neighbor in 2007.

Scotland Yard has apologized and agreed to compensation.

Cary accused Met Police of ‘shamelessly [digging] their heels in for nine years’ and the delays amounted to a ‘travesty of justice and professionalism’.

It originated from February 2007  when Cary told police he had been called a ‘poof’ and a ‘queer’ by a neighbor as he rode home on his bicycle.

Officers investigated the report and decided to take no further action.

He then lodged a complaint about the way the force had treated his report, and this was then dismissed by officers.

Appealing to the Independent Police Complaints Commission twice, the force was asked to reinvestigate but this was also rejected.

Cary began legal action against both the Met and the IPCC in January 2010, with the IPCC agreeing to settle the case in July 2012. The Met continued to defend the claim.

And while the case was due to be heard in the Court of Appeal on Monday, Scotland Yard offered to settle the case and offer an apology before the hearing. This was nine years after the incident had taken place.

‘I wasn’t asking for preferential treatment, I was just asking to be treated like anybody else,’ he said on Radio 4 Today, saying he had ‘sort of lost nine years of my life’.

‘I felt belittled and treated like a second-class citizen,’ he added. ‘I felt they prolonged the case in the hope of wearing me down.’