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Kümülatif’s launches clean-cut industrial debut collection

Kümülatif’s launches clean-cut industrial debut collection

Simple shapes allow users to explore the pieces' basic functions without any distractions.

Simplicity is key and the use of linen, copper and aluminum put the clear shapes of kümülatif’s first collection in the limelight.

No frills: these photo holders will hold more images than a standard frame.
No frills: these photo holders will hold more images than a standard frame.

Titled New Industry: Uncertain Geometry, the collection consists of a two mirrors, photo holders, a bowl, a container and a soft surface to study ‘properties of a matter such as weight, surface texture, reflectivity, and temperature.’

It was created by six of the Turkish collective’s designers and realized in partnership with Istanbul-based small-scale industries.

Material plays a big role for all pieces - like this bowl, made from copper of leather.
Material plays a big role for all pieces – like this bowl, made from copper of leather.

‘Thanks to their owners/operators who are willing to move out of their comfort zones, these production processes are open to intervention and can be subverted in unexpected ways,’ the group said.

Using a computer numerical control (CNC) router – a computer-controlled cutting machine for hard materials – and an embroidery machine, the collection explores the pieces’ form and function as well as the raw materials’ characteristics and abilities.

Atypical: fitting into the palm of a hand, the user will be surprised by the Mirror II's weight.
Atypical: fitting into the palm of a hand, the user will be surprised by the Mirror II’s weight.

Interacting with the objects reveals their purposes and the thought going into seemingly ambiguous forms: the unexpectedly heavy Mirror II fits perfectly into the palm of a hand, while the Soft Surface blurs geometrical forms into blurry textures.

Kümülatif describe themselves as ‘a non-hierarchical initiative that defines the design process as a collective experience’; the core team unites Mert, a social scientist, product designers Aysenaz and Billur, production specialist Melih and Necdet, a graphic designer.

Made from two very different materials, the Container's two halfes slot neatly together.
Made from two very different materials, the Container’s two halfes slot neatly together.

‘We question inequality in visibility of labor in the conventional design and production relations and propose sharing both authorship and earnings,’ the group said in a statement.

‘Immersing ourselves in this environment, we have lived/observed/tinkered/drew/made together. We challenged ourselves to run a democratic design and production process.’