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Melbourne Pride sizzles as thousands turn out to march on a hot summer’s day

Melbourne Pride sizzles as thousands turn out to march on a hot summer’s day

a twink sitting down with a small rainbow flag, he is wearing a black rimmed hat and colourful shirt

Thousands of people braved sweltering conditions to celebrate the end of the LGBTI Midsumma Festival at the Melbourne Pride March.

Temperatures of close to 104°F (40°C) didn’t stop people from marching along the streets of the beach side suburb, St Kilda.

The annual Pride March caps off the month long Midsumma Festival which starts with the popular carnival event. This year’s event started with some good news from the state government. Premier Daniel Andrews announced the state will become the first in Australia to outlaw gay conversion therapy.

‘This bigoted quackery that masquerades as healthcare, the notion that any gay Victorian is broken and needs to be fixed,’ he said at the Pride March.

Dylan Adler is an events manager and long-time presenter on Australia’s first LGBTI radio station, JOY 94.9. He marched at Pride with his JOY 94.9 colleagues.

‘This makes the 4th year I’ve marched with JOY 94.9,’ he told Gay Star News.

‘I think it’s important that queer people of colour to go to Pride events and represent their place and share their experiences. That’s what the space is there for so use it.’

Trans and bisexual activist Sally Goldner has only missed marching in Melbourne Pride since 1998. This year she marched with Transgender Victoria and Bisexual Alliance Victoria – one followed the other.

She told Gay Star News she marched despite the searing temperatures for a simple.

‘LGBTIQ people in many parts of the world who face huge amounts of prejudice would probably leap at the chance to march in safety regardless of weather. I kinda felt I owed to then to send the rainbow power-vibes their way,’ Goldner said.

‘I was excited to see so many trans flags at Pride… definitely the most flags ever and also in many groups, not just trans-specific one. It was also the biggest bi contingent I’ve seen… yay for bi visibility.’

Goldner said there was a lot of visibility for a lot of intersectional groups including, the asexual Melbourne Aces, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, youth (seniors withdraw due to weather), schools, local government areas and state government departments to name but a few.

‘So I’m a little bit of sunburn but it was well worth it,’ Goldner said.

Here are photos from Melbourne Pride March:

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A post shared by SCOUT HOUSE – Orlando Mesiti (@scoutstkilda) on

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A post shared by Dylan Adler (@dylanadler__) on

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A post shared by Fooi-Ling Khoo (@fooilingkhoo) on

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A post shared by Evie J Mac (@evie_m_official) on

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A post shared by Pamela Oleary (@pamelaolearyxo) on

See Also:

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews leads Melbourne Pride March

Melbourne to host special Pride to mark 40 years since decriminalization of gay sex

Australian politicians to march for marriage equality at Melbourne’s Midsumma Pride