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North Carolina Governor signs anti-LGBT law to restore ‘common sense’

North Carolina Governor signs anti-LGBT law to restore ‘common sense’

Governor Pat McCrory signing of the North Carolina budget in 2015

North Carolina’s Republican Governor, Pat McCrory, acted quickly last night to give his approval to the repeal of LGBT anti-discrimination protections.

Earlier in the day Republicans in the House of Representatives passed House Bill 2 blocking local governments in the state from enacting ordinances that would allow transgender people to use the restrooms that match their gender identities.

The law came about following the introduction of a bill in Charlotte earlier in the month that offered anti-discrimination protections to LGBT people. McCrory criticized the Charlotte bill, saying it ‘defies common sense.’

The Charlotte bill was due to take effect 1 April.

McCrory said in a statement: ‘The basic expectation of privacy in the most personal of settings, a restroom or locker room, for each gender was violated by government overreach and intrusion by the mayor and city council of Charlotte.’

‘The basic expectation of privacy in the most personal of settings, a restroom or locker room, for each gender was violated by government overreach and intrusion by the mayor and city council of Charlotte.

‘This radical breach of trust and security under the false argument of equal access not only impacts the citizens of Charlotte but people who come to Charlotte to work, visit or play. This new government regulation defies common sense and basic community norms by allowing, for example, a man to use a woman’s bathroom, shower or locker room.’

After signing HB2, he also Tweeted about why he had signed it.

Yesterday’s vote on the law thwarting LGBTI rights passed 83-25 within an hour of being introduced. It then passed 32-0 in the Senate, after Democratic politicians walked out and refused to take part.

‘We’re not participating in this effort to roll back the clock in this state,” said Senate Minority Leader Dan Blue.’

The American Civil Liberties Union were among the first to express their dismay at McCrory’s actions: ‘Today was a devastating day for LGBT North Carolinians and particularly our transgender community members who have been subjected to months of distorted rhetoric culminating in today’s display of bias and ignorance by North Carolina lawmakers,’ said Chris Brook, Legal Director of the ACLU of North Carolina in a statement.

‘We are disappointed that Governor McCrory did not do right by North Carolina’s families, communities, and businesses by vetoing this horribly discriminatory bill, but this will not be the last word.

‘The ACLU, Lambda Legal, and Equality NC are reviewing all options, including litigation.’

Chad Griffin, of Human Rights Campaign, was also unequivocal in his condemnation.

‘Governor McCrory’s reckless decision to sign this appalling legislation into law is a direct attack on the rights, well-being, and dignity of hundreds of thousands of LGBT North Carolinians and visitors to the state,’ he said in a statement.

‘Governor McCrory’s action will be judged sorely by history and serve as a source of deep shame, remorse, and regret.’