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Pride journeys are now part of London Transport Museum’s LGBTI project

Pride journeys are now part of London Transport Museum’s LGBTI project

Sacha Coward on his way to Pride in 2017. | Photo: supplied

A video recording six people’s journey to Pride in London and UK Black Pride will now become part of London Transport Museum’s collection.

Earlier this season, London Transport Museum launched a project called #MyJourneyToPride. The aim was to preserve and record the thoughts, feelings and experiences of people travelling to the parades in 2019.

2019 also marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which sparked the fight for LGBTI equality across the globe.

#MyJourneyToPride

Over the weekend of 6-7 July, several people used the hashtag to share their clips and pictures with the museum. The result is now part of its LGBTQ+ contemporary collecting project.

Following the parades, London Transport Museum’s Documentary Curator is contacting people to seek permission to preserve content they shared.

‘London’s transport has a part to play in bringing people together for Pride,’ Ellie Miles, Documentary Curator at London Transport Museum, said.

‘We wanted to offer a space to preserve and record the thoughts, feelings and experiences of people attending parades this year,’ Miles also said.

‘The journeys documented by our six video diarists – and the stories shared by the public using #MyJourneyToPride – will preserve a variety of opinions and lived experience across the LGBT+ community in London today for future generations,’ Miles then added.

Six LGBTI people and their journey to Pride

The six video diarists included Sacha Coward, the man behind the idea for #MyJourneyToPride.

They documented their journeys, which included both images of celebrations and anti-LGBTI verbal abuse.

Fam from being an isolated incident, anti-LGBTI verbal and physical abuse is on the rise in the UK. Ahead of this year’s Pride in London, a bisexual YouTuber was also victim of verbal anti-LGBTI abuse, as she documented on her Twitter.

‘We got to make sure that there is zero tolerance towards any form of hate towards the LGBTI community. Not just violence, but also hateful language,’ Khan told GSN during Pride in London this year.

‘We’ve seen across the world the rise of far-right movements from America to Hungary, from Italy to France and here in the UK as well. We have to make sure we just don’t talk the talk, we need to walk the walk too.’

See also

When is Pride? Check out our International Pride Calendar

16+ photos from the biggest UK Black Pride ever

35+ pictures of this year’s beautiful, trans-inclusive Pride in London