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Singapore’s prime vertical village crowned World Building of the Year 2015

Singapore’s prime vertical village crowned World Building of the Year 2015

Intertwined with green spaces, the Interlace creates a close network of social and living areas.

The Interlace, one of Singapore’s most ambitious and unusual residential developments, has been crowned World Building of the Year 2015 at the World Architecture Festival.

Built as a vertical village, OMA/Buro Ole Scheeren’s unique design strays away from the region’s classic housing – instead of clusters of isolated towers, the Interlace consists of 31 apartment blocks laced together.

Grouped around permeable courtyards, the Interlace creates a number of social and private spaces.
Grouped around permeable courtyards, the Interlace creates a number of social and private spaces.

‘The Interlace is blazing a trail with an example of bold, contemporary and architectural thinking,’ said Paul Finch, director of the World Architecture Festival.

‘The project presents an alternative way of thinking about developments which might otherwise become generic tower clusters.’

Stacked in hexagonal arrangements, the Interlace’s six-storey tall, 70 meter long blocks are grouped around eight large-scale, open courtyards, creating a network of internal and external environments of shared and private spaces on all levels; it is also closely intertwined with the natural environment, offering residents access to plenty of green spaces.

The project's unique structure of stacked apartments strays away from the classic high-rise tower clusters.
The project’s unique structure of stacked apartments strays away from the classic high-rise tower clusters.

Singapore’s prime example of a modern vertical village is the eighth development to snatch up the World Architecture Festival’s illustrious World Building of the Year award, following in the steps of projects such as Barcelona’s Media-ICT offices.

It is also a home project, winning in the last year of the World Architecture Festival’s four-year stint in Singapore; for the next four years, it will move to Berlin.

 

BIG's Vancouver House was praised for its clever use of modern urban topology.
BIG’s Vancouver House was praised for its clever use of modern urban topology.

Other winners of the Night included BIG Bjarke Ingels Group’s Vancouver House in Canada, which was awarded the Future Prioject of the Year 2015 award and praised for its ‘delightful’ incorporation of ‘new urban typology, mitigating the destructive impact of the highway flyover’.

Yanweizhou Park uses bridges to manage loods - and, at the same time, connects neighboring communities.
Yanweizhou Park uses bridges to manage floods – and, at the same time, connects neighboring communities.

Yanweizhou Park in China, a project by Turenscape International, won Landscape of the Year 2015 for its showcasing of a ‘replicable and resilient ecological solution to large-scale flood management’ and the ‘significant impact on flood migration and use of bridges to playfully knit the locality together’.