Now Reading
South Koreans opposing gay rights are less than 50% for the first time

South Koreans opposing gay rights are less than 50% for the first time

Korea Queer Culture Festival in 2014.

The portion of South Koreans opposing LGBTI rights has decreased, dipping below 50% for the first time in history.

A 2018 report suggests 49% of South Koreans said that they cannot accept homosexuals. The number has decreased from 57.2% tallied in 2017, according to the Korea Institute of Public Administration.

In terms of the tendency for minority exclusion, Korean women were less accepting than men of criminals, homosexuals, North Korean defectors and immigrants.

As for political orientation, more people identify as liberals than ever before, The Korea Times reports.

It showed 47.4% of the surveyed identifying as politically moderate, followed by liberals with 31.4% and conservatives with 21.2%.

In 2013, 22.6% of the population identified as liberals, compared with 31% as conservatives. 2013 was also the year in which Koreans opposing homosexuality accounted for 62.1%.

At the moment, there is no formal recognition of same-sex relationships in South Korea, with marriage or other forms of legal partnership are not available to same-sex partners.

See also:

South Korea slipping on LGBTI rights, activists warn

South Korea gives refuge to Ugandan lesbian at mortal risk if she returns home

Via Twitter, K-Pop star Jo Kwon supports South Korea’s embattled LGBTI community