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Thousands of UK men posthumously pardoned for historic gay sex crimes

Thousands of UK men posthumously pardoned for historic gay sex crimes

Bill named after Alan Turing will pass in Scotland

Thousands of gay and bisexual men were posthumously pardoned for historic gay sex crimes today (31 January).

The Policing and Crime Bill, known as ‘Turing’s Law’, gives pardons to anyone who has died with a crime on their record but only if it would not be considered a crime today.

‘This is a truly momentous day,’ Sam Gyimah, the Justice Minister said.

‘We can never undo the hurt caused, but we have apologized and taken action to right these wrongs.

‘I am immensely proud that “Turing’s Law” has become a reality under this government.’

The automatic pardons do not apply to anyone still living, although those who have successfully applied through the Home Office to have their historic offenses removed will see statutory pardons.

Not eligible are men who were convicted for an offense that involved a person younger than 16, was non-consensual or constitutes the offense of sexual activity in a public lavatory.

A separate Private Members’ Bill, introduced by John Nicolson MP, did not receive support from the Government.

Nicolson’s bill would’ve granted an automatic blanket pardon to any men convicted under the historic laws, as long as their conviction does not constitute a crime today, no matter if they’re dead or still living.