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Urban Outfitters slammed for tapestry ‘eerily’ similar to gay uniform in Nazi death camps

Urban Outfitters slammed for tapestry ‘eerily’ similar to gay uniform in Nazi death camps

Urban Outfitters has come under fire for a tapestry ‘eerily reminiscent’ of the gray-and-white stripes and pink triangles that gay male prisoners were forced to wear in Nazi concentration camps during World War II.

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) yesterday (9 February) urged the US retail chain to remove the offending article from stores.

‘Whether intentional or not, this gray and white stripped pattern and pink triangle combination is deeply offensive and should not be mainstreamed into popular culture,’ said Abraham Foxman, ADL national director and Holocaust survivor, in a statement.

‘We urge Urban Outfitters to immediately remove the product eerily reminiscent of clothing forced upon the victims of the Holocaust from their stores and online.’

In a letter to Urban Outfitters president and CEO Richard Hayne, ADL expressed its concern over the insensitive design and the company’s periodic use of products within the realm of Holocaust imagery.

in April 2012, ADL issued a strongly-worded letter of condemnation to Urban Outfitters about a t-shirt associated with the yellow Star of David.

Eight years before, the chain sold a shirt bearing the slogan, ‘Everybody loves a Jewish girl,’ surrounded by dollar signs.

Urban Outfitters has also managed to offend blacks and Native Americans in the past.

From 1933 to 1945, the Nazis arrested up to 100,000 gay men. Some were tried and sentenced in courts, while others were sent directly to concentration camps.

The death rate of gay prisoners in the camps was over 50%, the highest among non-Jewish victims.