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Woman in the UK becomes surrogate mother for gay son

The biological father is reported to be the first single man to have a child through surrogacy in the UK, and the first to do so using his own mother as a surrogate

Woman in the UK becomes surrogate mother for gay son

Desperate to become a father and having been turned away by surrogacy clinics across the country, the then 24-year-old gay man decided to approach his mother to be a surrogate to carry his child after plans to have another female relative do so fell through.

Kyle Casson’s mother Anne-Marie, then 45, gave birth to her grandson, Miles, eight months ago via C-section, according to media reports.

She became pregnant via IVF after an anonymous donor egg – arranged through a fertility clinic – was fertilized with sperm from her son, Kyle.

A High Court judge ruled this week that the infant’s biological father can legally adopt the child although he’s the infant’s brother in the eyes of the law.

Mrs Casson said in the Mirror: ‘He is not biologically tied to me, other than he’s my grandson. I love being a parent and for Kyle to experience that, I would do that for him.’

Kyle was quoting as saying in the Daily Mail, ‘I did not chose to be gay, I was born that way. I was born being unable to have kids. I can’t just go and have sex with a woman. Being a dad was a high priority in my life and now I have done it.’

He added that reactions from his family and friends have been ‘overwhelmingly positive’ apart from one friend.

Kyle is said to be the first single man to have a child through surrogacy in the UK, and the first to do so using his own mother as a surrogate.

He is also believed to be the first man to adopt his own baby to get full custody as he had no rights over his child as a single parent under UK surrogacy laws.

Mrs Casson husband’s who is Kyle’s stepfather, consented to the surrogacy is Mile’s legal father and the couple are named on the infant’s birth certificate.

For babies born by surrogate mothers abroad, the law in Britain requires two parents to apply for a parental order, according to the Mail.


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